InglesCoruña.com

El Blog de las academias Innova English School

LIVING IN CANADA: Racoons – love them or hate them!

Compartir:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

descarga

Here’s how Wikipedia defines them:
The raccoon, colloquially known as coon, is a medium-sized mammal native to North America. The raccoon has a body length of 40 to 70 cm and a body weight of 3.5 to 9 kg. Its grayish coat mostly consists of dense underfur which insulates against cold weather. Two of the raccoon’s most distinctive features are its extremely dexterous front paws and its facial mask, which are themes in the mythology of several Native American tribes. Raccoons are noted for their intelligence, with studies showing that they are able to remember the solution to tasks for up to three years. The diet of the omnivorous raccoon, which is usually nocturnal, consists of about 40% invertebrates, 33% plant foods, and 27% vertebrates.
The original habitats of the raccoon are deciduous and mixed forests, but due to their adaptability they have extended their range to mountainous areas, coastal marshes, and urban areas, where some homeowners consider them to be pests. As a result of escapes and deliberate introductions in the mid-20th century, raccoons are now also distributed across the European mainland, the Caucasus region and Japan.
Though previously thought to be solitary, there is now evidence that raccoons engage in gender-specific social behaviour. Related females often share a common area, while unrelated males live together in groups of up to four animals to maintain their positions against foreign males during the mating season, and other potential invaders. Home range sizes vary anywhere from 3 hectares (7 acres) for females in cities to 50 km2 (20 sq mi) for males in prairies. After a gestation period of about 65 days, two to five young, known as “kits”, are born in spring. The kits are subsequently raised by their mother until dispersal in late fall. Although captive raccoons have been known to live over 20 years, their average life expectancy in the wild is only 1.8 to 3.1 years. In many are-as, hunting and vehicular injury are the two most common causes of death.

Now, welcome to read more about the urban raccoon:
http://nautil.us/issue/18/genius/the-intelligent-life-of-the-city-raccoon


Compartir:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Comparatives and Superlatives: A review about smarphones

Compartir:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

First Certificate Exams (Writing and Speaking Parts) are all about expressing your opinion. So I’ve asked my students to use comparatives and superlatives to write a review about smartphones.

After rounds of debates, here’s what our student, Adrián Fernández had chosen. He made a powerpoint too! We have converted it into images. Check it out:


Compartir:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Sentence of the week

Compartir:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

❝If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his own language, that goes to his heart.❞
‒Nelson Mandela
Siempre hay esos días en los que estudiando un idioma extranjero tan de moda como el japonés o el chino este se te atora y piensas: ¿Por qué me estoy rompiendo la cabeza aprendiendo un idioma tan complicado como este si me pueden entender en inglés?
Como muy sabiamente dijo Nelson Mandela, cuando hablas a alguien en su propio idioma, le llega al corazón. Y para qué quiere uno saber idiomas si no para poder comunicarse, crear nuevos vínculos y poder medrar como persona. El trabajo viene y va pero los amigos que hagas sabiendo otros idiomas, si dios quiere, serán para toda la vida. Los idiomas pueden ser complicados en ocasiones, pero no os deis por vencidos; la recompensa merece la pena.

Compartir:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

5 Essential English Idioms for Sounding Like a Native Part I

Compartir:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

So you’re in an American bar.

It’s loud, but you can make out what people are saying.

You hear a fellow drinker talking about hitting books…

…another is talking about twisting someone’s arm…

…and it sounds like someone’s been stabbed in the back.

What the heck is going on?

You scratch your head and wonder why you’re still lost even though you can translate the words.

Well, you’ve just had your first introduction to English idioms.

 

WHAT ARE ENGLISH IDIOMS ?

English idioms are a group of words which have a meaning which isn’t obvious from looking at the individual words.

They have developed over time and so they might seem random to you. English idioms often rely on analogies and metaphors.

Because they’re used so often in everyday English, if you don’t know them, it’s almost impossible to understand the context.

LET´S SEE 5 OF THEM!!!

1. (To) Hit the books

Literally, hit the books means to physically hit, punch or slap your reading books. However, this is a common English idiom among students, especially American college students who have a lot of studying to do. It simply means “to study,” and is a way of telling your friends that you’re going to study. It could be for a final exam, a mid-term test or even an English exam.

 “Sorry but I can’t watch the game with you tonight, I have to hit the books. I have a huge exam next week!”

2. (To) Hit the sack

Just like the first idiom, the literal meaning of this would be physically hitting or beating a sack (a large bag usually used for carrying things in bulk such as flour, rice or even soil). But actually to hit the sack means to go to bed, and you’d use this to tell your friends or family that you’re really tired, so you’re going to sleep. Instead of saying hit the sack you can also say hit the hay.

“It’s time for me to hit the sack, I’m so tired.”

3. (To) Twist someone’s arm

To twist someone’s arm literally means to take a person’s arm and turn it around, which could be really painful if you take it exactly word for word. If your arm has been twisted it means that someone has done a great job of convincing you to do something you might not have wanted to to do.

And if you manage to twist someone else’s arm it means that you’re great at convincing them, and they’ve finally agreed to do something after you’ve been begging them.

Tom: Jake you should really come to the party tonight!

Jake: You know I can’t, I have to hit the books (study).

Tom: C’mon, you have to come! It’s going to be so much fun and there are going to be lots of girls there. Please come?

Jake: Pretty girls? Oh all right, you’ve twisted my arm, I’ll come!

4. (To be) Up in the air

When we think literally about something up in the air, we have the idea that something’s floating or flying in the sky, perhaps an airplane or a balloon. But really if someone tells you that things are up in the air it means that these things are uncertain or unsure; definite plans have not been made yet.

“Jen have you set a date for the wedding yet?”

“Not exactly, things are still up in the air and we’re not sure if our families can make it on the day we wanted. Hopefully we’ll know soon and we’ll let you know as soon as possible.”

5. (To) Stab someone in the back

If we take this idiom literally we could find ourselves in a whole lot of trouble with the police, as it would mean taking a knife or another sharp object and putting into a person’s back.

However, as an idiom, to stab someone in the back means to hurt someone who was close to us and trusted us by betraying them secretly and breaking their trust. We call the person who does this a back stabber.

“Did you hear that Sarah stabbed Kate in the back last week?”

“No! I thought they were best friends, what did she do?”

“She told their boss that Kate wasn’t interested in a promotion at work and Sarah got it instead.”

“Wow, that’s the ultimate betrayal! No wonder they’re not friends anymore.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Compartir:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

If I were you or If I was you?

Compartir:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Which one is correct – if I were you or if I was you?

The word were in the phrase if I were you is special form. It is known as the subjunctive mood (from the grammatical point of view).

Today you also find the phrase if I was you. Here Simple Past form of be is used. But there are people who say that this phrase is incorrect and would never use it (mainly Americans). Others say that this phrase can be used.

  • If I were you I would phone him. → subjunctive mood
  • If I was you I would phone him. → Simple Past.

The following song by the group Beirut uses the second form, which would be considered incorrected by Americans. Let’s just think of poetic license. Check out the lyrics by clicking on the following link:

And now, enjoy the music video …

 

 


Compartir:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

To pull someone’s leg

Compartir:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

joey43

To pull someone’s leg

I remember a day, as I was a child, eating at home with my family… My dad told my younger (and only) sister something strange and then said: “c’mon, I’m just pulling your leg!”. So what did she do next? Well, she looked under the table because she didn’t feel any pulling. And we all laughed!! And here’s why (in case you don’t know this English idiom):

To pull someone’s leg = to tell someone something that is not true as a way of joking with the person, for example: Stop pulling my leg– you didn’t have lunch with Madonna!

(Definition of pull someone’s leg from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Check out for more:


Read More


Compartir:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

A Short Story by PET students.

Compartir:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

María (13) and Carlos (12) are siblings who are preparing for the PET exam. Last year they both passed the KET exam and hope to repeat the success this summer. Here is a short story written by both:

Once upon a time there was a dude called Mike. He lived in London with his dog, Woofie. Every morning, Mike went to Starbucks for a muffin and coffee and a special cupcake for Woofie… but, one day everything changed…

He was a lawyer and he had a new case in another country. Mike moved to Paris with Woofie. Woofie hated Paris because he wanted his special cupcakes but in Paris they only had baguettes for dogs.

Mike was investigating that the Mona Lisa had been stolen from the Louvre. After investigating a long time, he discovered that Woofie stole the painting because he hated baguettes and wanted to return to London to eat his special cupcakes.

So, in court , he presented the evidence and the judge thought that it was another dog called Milou who was similair to Woofie. Milou was found guilty and he was sent to a special jail for dogs. Mike was so happy that Woofie was innocent that he took Woofie to London to Harrods to have a haircut and eat special cupcakes for dogs made by a very famous chef.

 


Compartir:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

The Do’s, the Don’t’s and the Oh God Please Don’t’s of Eating Sushi

Compartir:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Many people love sushi; but, are we eating it the same way as the Japanese? Should I eat the ginger with sushi and mix the wasabi with soya sauce? How about ketchup, can I use ketchup?

 

Well the purpose of the pink ginger is actually for ‘washing’ your mouth between different kinds of sushi so you can taste the different flavour of fish!

 

This website has a simple guide (with pictures) to show you the Do’s, the Don’t’s and the Oh God Please Don’t’s of Eating Sushi. Here’s the Link.

 

Enjoy!

 


Compartir:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Ni chicha ni limoná – It’s not chicha, not lemonade – Neither/nor

Compartir:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Maybe you had the chance to enjoy this ad when watching TV (in case you weren’t so lucky don’t worry, youtube is your friend)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16Iw1pRgtPk
Idiom aside, the structure you should be trying to use is neither/nor instead of the literal not/not
“Neither” combines two different negative ideas and separates them using the preposition ” nor“. For example:
  • Neither Henry nor Chris want to go to the beach. (Ni Henry ni Chris quieren ir a la playa.)
  • Neither the school nor the parents want to take responsibility for the problem. (Ni la escuela ni los padres quieren asumir la responsibilidad del problema.)
Therefore, it’s neither chicha nor lemonade. However, in case you are curious about it, the correct idiom would be “It’s neither fish nor fowl (nor good red herring)”.
Have a nice day!

 


Compartir:
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Páginas:1234567...33